Full Moon July 13, 2022

For this Full Moon, I highly recommend listening to Mary Stewart Adam’s Story of Selene (appx 1-2 minutes.) Adams does an excellent job of using story and myth to weave imagery into the study of the sky. Virgo is on the ascendant at the time of the full moon. It seems the Sun, Mercury, and Ceres are partners at the top of the chart, while the Moon and Pluto are partner at the nadir. Venus and Saturn flank each cluster, evenly spaced at 29 degrees, creating a beautiful trine to the ascendant. Then within 60 degrees we have the rest of the planetary wanderers. By sidereal zodiac, both Jupiter and Neptune are in Pisces now, with Neptune at 0 degrees.

Chart of the Full Moon for Jul 13, 2022

what astrologers can and can’t tell you

What are the kinds of questions that you can ask an Astrologer? This is a very good question, especially if you have never had a reading done before. I found a helpful article from Holisticm that I’d like to share:

5 Great Questions To Ask An Astrologer

Alright, so you’re ready to meet with your astrologer for the first time — what do you ask?

  1. According to my natal chart, what are my natural gifts and talents? What aspects of my life require more focus and attention from me?
  2. What is the lesson I’m supposed to learn in this life (ask them to check your North Node!)
  3. What do I need to know about how I give and receive love?
  4. What do I need to know about money and my relationship to it?
  5. What types of people would make great partners and friends for me?

For the full article from Holisticism visit

https://carrot-guitar-jhrz.squarespace.com/journal-library/ask-astrology-question

Earth’s frenetic buzz of robust life

How can we achieve a balance between self-awareness and awareness of the world around us? There is the ordinary everyday life and there is life in the spiritual world, or spiritual truth, spiritual reality. This can also be considered in another way, as balance between self- awareness and that of another, or awareness between self and a group, or society as a whole. It seems this is a fundamental question we must resolve in the course of life. The battleground of the heart is fought on the pages of our calendars, where we give our time and attention. If we give too much attention to the mundane parts of life, then it can tend to lose its joy and meaning. If we devote our attention entirely to spiritual questions we may lose a grip on our closest and most endearing values, our relationships, or we may not manage our resources effectively or for the most benefit and enjoyment.

Isn’t it possible that the natural world is just as holy and just as sacred as the spiritual world?

One only has to plant a garden to consider this possibility.  The gardener marvels at his harvest.   He knows that he did not provide the rain, the sun, or the forces that make a seed sprout, nor the forces that make it bloom, grow, and reproduce.  All of those forces are inherent in creation itself. But a gardener does take part in this great dance. He does his part, observing his garden, observing the seasons.  He does his part to plant the seed, he tends it with his love and hard work and he reaps the reward of his dedication and hard work. This begins with observation and willingness to take part in the dance of creation and help it along.

It is a sublime lesson. The ordinary, simple and everything things in life are in fact quite spiritual. This then leads to an acceptance of ourselves and others.  Nothing is below us. Scrubbing the toilet is a necessary part of everyday life.  Changing a diaper, doing the dishes; these are all necessary.  We are all here to experience life from a certain angle or perspective which was provided at birth, and can be discovered in the birth chart, our astrological blueprint.

The intricacy of all living things, the manifold nature of the spiral teaches us!

We are doing a fabulously, wildly diverse job of experiencing life from billions of perspectives. An estimated 8 billion people all with unique perspectives, all inhabiting the planet at the same moment. Earth is teeming with human life, just bursting at the seams with it.  Humanity has probably never lived in a more frenetic time-space experience than now.  Our current times are a wildly robust. Appreciating that robustness of life with gratitude creates excitement for living. Understanding our unique perspectives and blueprints create more acceptance of self among diverse people from different times and places, something so greatly needed in our times.

Einstein told his son in a letter that carpentry was more important
that school because of what you could learn from it.

Rediscovering Perspectives

It can be challenging to embrace the opposite viewpoint on an issue, but there are opportunities in the process.

Not long ago I attended a Houston Museum of Fine Arts exhibit of Georgia O’Keeffe‘s photography. I recall learning how meticulously O’Keefe would explore the different perspectives of one scene in her photographs to see how each change in her approach communicated the subject. I was reminded of this because for the past two years I had stepped back from the anthroposophical perspective to go more deeply into classical western astrology. I felt this was a necessary step to become more fluent in Astrology and to feel a more confident base of knowledge.

View of Starhouse in Boulder

But this week I attempted to stretch myself in changing perspectives by attending a week-long study in Boulder of sidereal astrology led by Brian Gray, Robert Sciappecase, and David Tressemer. After several years of working with western I began to miss the heart-connection and spirit-based meaning and interpretation that came from anthroposophically-aligned approaches. This has been a return to my Waldorf roots but now applied to astrology.

Their approach translates the four fold, anthroposophical view of the human being into astrological terms on a birth chart. It has been fascinating, like turning from an east facing window to a west facing window and embracing the same landscape but through a different lens.

I have some new ideas to play with. Probably the most significant has been to more deeply investigate the NADIR of the chart. Understanding this often ignored angle of the chart, the earth point, puts us in better relationship to the ground of our being. Planets and signs located at the fourth house support our sense of security, our base from which we can venture on out into the world and accomplish our mission.

As an aside, I am pleasantly surprised by the quality of the materials and the attention to detail and thoroughness of the course as it is designed. A few participants have struggled with the more basic vocabulary which had I not already studied a fair amount through Western Astrology would likely have also caused me struggle. In that regard I feel I have been able to help a few classmates by sharing my understanding and I have been grateful for the solid foundation my studies in Western Astrology provided me.

But perhaps the most wonderful part has been the human touches: ample opportunity for movement, opportunity for breaks, ample opportunity for artistic rendition, and discussion which aid in the digestion of the material. The attention to these things facilitates the learning immensely and create a caring and supportive environment.

Book Review: Thrive

Thrive: The Purpose of Schools in a Changing World by Valerie Hannon

Several years ago I subscribed to a newsletter put out by Education Re-Imagined, a non-profit organization that connects people and programs that work on the frontiers of educational innovation. It was through reading one of their recent newsletter issues I learned of this book, Thrive. Its co-authors are Valerie Hannon and Amelia Peterson.

Thrive: The Purpose of Schools in a Changing World Thrive: The Purpose of Schools in a Changing World

Hannon is co-founder of the Innovation Unit of Global Leader Partnership and Peterson, has a PhD in Education from Harvard University.

Thrive gives a research-based overview of existing evidence and case studies of innovative school programs world-wide with a framework of suggestions to realign educational goals towards creating conditions that promote “thriving.” First, the authors set about defining what they mean by “thriving.” They give four levels of thriving:

A. Global
B. Societal
C. Interpersonal
D. Intrapersonal

Then they identify four key questions:

1. How can all learners best prepare for economies with technology-driven opportunities and development?
2. What tasks can humans perform better than machines and conversely, what tasks can machines perform better than humans?
3. What knowledge and skills do humans need to shape and direct computing power?
4. How can people best be prepared to learn and relearn skills to do human work, rather than be second class robots?


There is a central theme throughout the book of generating a more sustainable relationship with the Earth and its resources in the future. The authors identify both economic globalization and migration as key issues effecting the future.

They prioritize a different relationship between humans and our environment as a key desired outcome. The authors make the claim that education’s purpose is not to merely position kids for wealth acquisition in the job marketplace.

Hannon provides ample school examples already creating conditions for thriving with descriptions of their programs. She discusses an Ecosystems Approach that addresses:

A. Equipping learners for a disrupted jobs/work landscape (published post-Covid)
B. Educating for building respectful relationships in diverse, technologized societies
C. Creating local sustainability endeavors that address problems in local communities
D. Providing real-life application of knowledge, addressing “learner agency”

I liked hearing about how innovative schools in others locations are already adressing and accomplishing these tasks. I would have liked to have seen more data about learner outcomes attached to this overview of innovation. More could be done to follow up on these outcomes. How well did students of these types of programs do on measured learning standards, and perhaps for the more established programs, how did the graduates measure in terms of life happiness, mental health, employability, and the broader goals of interpersonal and intrapersonal thriving as they became adults? Where results were available, it would have been nice to hear more of it although the lack of data is not the necessarily the fault of the author.

The book does accomplish the goal of helping the audience become aware of what is currently being done in schools across a broad range of issues to address global problems we face. Teachers interested in innovation and change will be interested in this book.



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